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Y’all know how this works. This has to be taken care of. Now.

And people: what’s this about it having been there since yesterday morning? Twenty four hours, and it’s still up? What gives? Which of you were out cruising for babes in the black helicopter instead of doing your regular patrols, huh?

Sloppy. Inexcusable, even… That’s the trouble with the shadow government these days… No work ethic. In my day, sinister, faceless drones of the military industrial complex took pride in being sinister, faceless drones of the military industrial complex…

Anyway. Get to it, already.



ETA: Ah. I see you’ve got off yer duffs and leaned on the good doctor for a retraction. Excellent. Now that’s more like it.

…No, this does not mean you can take the helicopter out again ‘to get it washed’…

I mean, geez. You people are incureable.



EATA: By all that’s unholy, McSweeney’s is onto us, now, too? You’ve got to be kidding me.

Dammit, people, this won’t do. We just suck at this suppressing the terrible truth thing, these last few days. We really do.

So yeah, we’re gonna have to call a meeting, do a post mortem on this one…

Oh, stop yer whining. It’s for your own good.

27/01/2009 : We are amused

Eamon has the story on some yutz in a dress’ view of recent alterations to US federal policy on foreign aid groups doing family planning counselling…

The irony of a group whose leader is apparently an infallible, direct line to a mythical magic pixie whose followers claim created the universe charging anyone with ‘arrogance’ is already noted…

But more broadly… memo to the media: look, I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again: just stop quoting the Vatican. Completely. Entirely. Enough already. You’re just encouraging the nutters, and it really adds nothing to the discussion, never has. If you really need the view of some delusional wanker who thinks the voices he hears (or claims to hear) in his head are somehow relevant to any nation’s policy direction, there have to be any number of diagnosed hallucinatory schizophrenics who’d do just as well. And they’re probably dying for the attention…

Seriously. Let your fingers do the walking, call the mental hospital, have the staff pick one at random. I figure their opinions are about as likely to be worth hearing. And if the choice is between taking their advice on ethical questions and that of the folk whose solution to paedophilia in the priesthood is to move ‘em somewhere they won’t be prosecuted, I’m thinking the mental patients are probably the better bet, anyhow, really.

ETA: Heh… And I see the ever-excellent Jesus and Mo has also noticed this, and has made more or less the same joke I did at Eamon’s place…

Okay, sure, it’s a joke that pretty much writes itself. But still: nice.

26/01/2009 : Boarding 101

So I’m writing this from Camp Fortune—a nearby ski hill I frequent…

Milestone: I tried snowboarding today for the first time.

It went well—I think. Following an old friend’s advice (thanks, Ken, if you read this), I did the one hour lesson thing, and was doing basic turns semi-comfortably by the end of that, and sorta sporadically linking them together…

Re how well it went: honestly, I’m not entirely sure. My coach was all about how quickly I was picking it up—from the moment I glided off the lift (first time, with relief) without wiping out or knocking anyone else over (and, tho’ this seems a suspiciously modest accomplishment, true enough, I guess, I have seen beginning boarders do both at the top of the lift, and sometimes spectacularly), through to the moment I pulled off a proper turn with edge transfer from heel to toe (and this, I can assure you, did not come as easily nor as painlessly as stepping off the lift without turtling), but I figure you never know with those guys—I’d expect building up your confidence could easily just be part of the required approach for absolute beginners looking down that hill thinking of too many ways of breaking things best not broken—

Anyway, whether or not that was really much of a showing, notes: i) it’s really nothing like skiing—I’m not sure having some experience there really could have given me any advantage over any other beginner—and while I seem to recall learning (alpine) skiing was generally pretty painless for me—probably in large part because I was doing cross-country from an early age—boarding’s been another matter entirely. Fun, sure, but fun which has been intermixed with considerably more pain than learning skiing ever was—and one knee in particular is now notifying me of its resentment over this adventure. ii) said pain notwithstanding, yes, it was seriously fun. Enough that I’ll definitely be trying it out again—tho’ there will be logistic complications—my little guy is getting up to speed on his skis now, but I still have to ski right with him when he’s out—and this involves tricks I’m only up to as yet on skis…

Anyway. Point is: Fun was had.

(Written from the hill using my chordal PSP-based beasty—which, in fact, I have now actually used from a chairlift. Though this is in fact not terribly practical, as I’ve discovered, and as you might suspect… The unit’s up to it just fine. My fingers, not so much. Typing at 20 or so below involves pain, too.)

20/01/2009 : How's that again?

So there’s zero details on this—so far just this blurb in the New Scientist (NB: not to be taken as authoritative, and now and then given to this sorta blurry rumour stuff), but the rumour is that one Jean-Philippe Beaulieu of the Paris Astrophysical Institute announced at a meeting of the RAS in London that exoplanet MOA-2007-BLG-192-L b may, in fact, be lighter than previously reported: his new figure is it may be a mere 1.4 Earth masses…

Taking this to ramifications is probably getting a bit ahead of the game, right now. But still, cool news.

18/01/2009 : Steel wheels

So I’m writing this from a Tim Horton’s*, looking out at a grey city, shrouded in falling snow. Across the street at a Canadian Tire, they’re pulling the steel rim off my left front wheel, to replace it with a new one…

I have to ask if it can possibly get more Canadian than this.

I got lucky, really, that it’s just the rim, and, mirabile dictu, somehow, despite the force of the impact—an impact that deflected the edge of the rim a good inch or so inward for something like a quarter of the wheel’s circumference—the snow tire didn’t even let go of its seal. Coulda been a lot worse, two kids in the back seat, the car sliding suddenly sideways on the turn ramp in a snow storm. And you brake and turn and countersteer and try every trick you’ve got time for to keep from sliding into the cross traffic or a lighting pole…

So yeah, lucky it’s just the rim—except that technically I guess I don’t quite know yet with certainty that it is just the rim—there could of course be bigger trouble in there somewhere, in brakes and linkages.

(Crosses fingers there won’t be…)

But still, no injuries, and no body damage—just the jarring crack of the impact as the rim bounces hard off the curb, then the vehicle wobbles shakily back onto the ramp, now with one hell of a shake in the steering, sure, but functional enough anyway to limp a few blocks to an open garage…

So I stop at Canadian Tire—because it’s Sunday, and the dealer’s closed, and so’s the tire shop that put the snow tires on, and I’m still holding out a faint hope I might eventually make it to the ski hill today if I can just get this tended to quickly enough…

This is Canadiana, early 21st century variant—calling my wife to come in the other car (carefully) and get the kids, then spending ten minutes beneath the fluorescent lights of the Canadian Tire getting the parts desk to find me a rim, then booking the thing into the repair queue, then finally putting on mitts and scrabbling through the snow to get a not-terribly good/not terribly bad coffee that only costs like a buck and a half, and sitting at a tiny, square, two-tone table, watching the snow and waiting, listening to the Stones on some miscellaneous oldies station… And the lesson of the moment is never forget this is winter, and this is Canada, and however lovely is the sound from the car stereo, however much they’ve added pretty digital displays to every dashboard, you’re still rolling through the fundamental inhospitality of a snow squall, and bad things do happen in those.

(No, sadly, the Stones tune wasn’t anything from Steel Wheels. Pity. That woulda been a nice little detail…)

In a not particularly related development, yestereve, myself and said lovely wife got out to see Tempting Providence—the Theatre Newfoundland Labrador’s telling of the story of Myra Bennett—a nurse who travelled in the 20s to the coast of Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula, into the poverty and privation of the tiny, isolated settlement of Daniel’s Harbour, where she would make her indelible mark by pulling thousands of teeth, delivering hundreds of babies, marrying one Angus Bennett—a local man, and then with him making a legendary trek in the teeth of that forbidding land’s pitiless winter 60 miles overland through the then trackless waste to bring his brother (and thus her brother-in-law) and the foot she had just sewn back onto his leg to a doctor… Besides solving a local medical mystery—and one that had been the source of some tragedy—the odd prevalence of breech births in the community—details left at just that, here, to avoid spoiling it for you entirely, should you get ‘round to seeing it yourself someday.

That was more early 20th century Canadiana—and I wouldn’t in my wildest dreams compare my trials of today with that tale of hardship and courage. Sixty miles through the mountains and fjords of the northern peninsula versus a short drive on a wobbly rim and a walk across the street, ‘n all… Oh, and do see the play, long as I’m on the subject, if you get the chance. You won’t often catch me recommending theatre, but I’ll make an exception for this show. Great cast, great script, great story, all leaving little more you could possibly ask for… To call Nurse Bennett’s tale compelling is to be more than a bit too cautious with adjectives…

But, I still find myself thinking, again, sitting here, waiting for a verdict from the mechanics—thinking, as I’d begun to say back there—that there is something to keep in mind, here: that however 21st century your life becomes, there are still some constants…

And among them is an underlying capriciousness in the heart of winter from which no satellite technology, no layer of impermeable Gore-Tex, no lightweight high-speed engine will ever entirely entirely protect you.

(ETA: happy ending, more or less—it did wind up just being the rim… though we never did make it to the ski hill. Again, there are worse things.)

*Yes, with my trusty little PSP-based hyper-portable editor—I’d brought it along thinking it might be of some use for killing time on the chairlift… The practicality of this notion thus remains as yet untested, but I can now confirm it’s quite up to the rigours of coffee shops.

17/01/2009 : DNS trouble

So, apparently due to some server migration issues a certain hosting company neglected to mention to me, the site had gone temporarily dark until just now… ‘S fixed as of this moment.

So no, I wasn’t making any unscripted exits or nothin’. Technical problems, is all.

16/01/2009 : Caption this photo

So it’s one of those really crazy cold days in Ottawa. 25 below this morning not counting the windchill. (And really, you’re better off not thinking too long on what it is with the windchill. That just gets a bit… intimidating, really.)

Today’s routine involved a few things not so routine. Observation: pulling a battery out of a recalcitrant car in order to do the indoor charge thing is slightly more awkward with thick, windproof, removable lining mitts on, but it is, on balance, the way you want to do it. Insofar as having the frost-coated wrench stick to exposed skin is probably a worse option.

So I’ve been doing the balaclava thing a lot. It just makes sense, at these temperatures. Exposing skin unnecessarily, that’s just not smart. Between skiing and skating, I’ve got a few of the things around anyway. Might as well make use of the equipment at hand.

But I’m trying to work out if it’s really making folk a bit leery or if I’m just imagining that. What with the image of said accessory in popular culture as the garment of choice for bank robbers and terrorists, I figure it could be either way. It really did seem the other morning as I walked into the coffee shop with the thing on that I was getting these nervous looks from some of those present, anyway..

Imagined dialogue: it’s cool, people, really. No one has to get hurt, here…

Just hand over the coffee, and this can go real smoothly.

Easy, now…
Apple introduces the laptop wheel

As I commented in response to the former colleague who sent me this: they could actually have something in that ‘predictive sentence technology’… if it were adaptive, and remembered sentences you’d previously typed. ‘Course, for a lot of web users, the list would be short:

  • LOL
  • tl;dr
  • fag

Select one.

(In other and only slightly more serious news, yes, I’m still moving along with the chordal one for the PSP, bit by bit. Expect I’ll try putting together the next post on it, again, just as an exercise. It’s really not terribly painful, now.)
They’ve pinpointed some methane plumes on Mars.

Background: on Earth, you see stuff like this, it usually means living methanogens, deep, deep down. Those have been around a while, and are the sort of extremophiles (as in, we consider the sort of places they live extremely inhospitable, thus: extremophiles) that could plausibly have persisted over the few gigayears that have gone past since Mars last had abundant water on its surface…

Yes, there are abiotic ways for the methane to turn up. But in the pull quote of the day, do keep in mind:

Lisa Pratt says methane from rock (serpentinization) is rare on Earth and actually plugs up active sites. This is why she takes biology seriously as “slightly more plausible.”

I believe this is my cue to pour a glass of Bushmills.

(Via Pharyngula.)

15/01/2009 : Ça marche

So I’m writing this post using one of my PSPs and the chordal keyboard scheme I described last week.

It’s really only just doable now. I’ve been putting together this simple text-processor thingy on and off over the last few days—nothing fancy—just the bare minimum I need to be able seriously to test the concept—and it really just got to the point where it was usable enough to write this a minute or two ago. It’s this simple character-based display thing—about as friendly as you’d expect hackish alpha software to be—which is to say not very.

But it’s functional enough that I can write this, anyway. Speedwise, things are looking up, as well, which is promising, as that was, of course, the whole point to the exercise. I’m clocking in around 20 wpm average—which, yes, is very modest for me—but bursting to 50 regularly on words my fingers have apparently gotten used to—so I expect the potential speed is somewhere more in that direction. Still well short of what I can do on a real keyboard, but nothing to sneeze at for a ten-key portable device I don’t need to rest on a tabletop to use.

So, in short, I may have something here after all.

08/01/2009 : Keyboard experiments

So I type pretty quickly. On a full-sized, standard QWERTY board, on a basic transcription test I just took to check my current speed, I clocked in at 90 wpm sans errors, which I gather is pretty respectable. This is from a long history of having to: several years as a reporter, a decade and change in tech industries mostly being about code and prose, and your fingers do get to the point where it’s not even remotely conscious what they’re doing. I suspect I probably exceed 90, as well, pretty regularly—typing what you’re thinking versus typing what you’re reading is a slightly different thing. Should check this. Anyway…

I find this an awfully useful thing to be able to do. No, it doesn’t quite keep pace with thought—a maddening reality—but it’s close enough, and your composition habits adapt, it seems to me, to this limit, cope well enough with that 90 wpm throttle that it’s not much of an irritation so much as a fact of life you get used to. And the relatively unconscious nature of the process means you can compose at a keyboard, think at a keyboard, without the process itself getting in the way…

Which makes a lot of non-standard keyboard input device thingies incredibly annoying for me. One of the reasons I favour Thinkpads as laptops is I find they’re reasonably close in feel and behaviour to a decent full-sized board, and seem to take the punishment of fast and heavy strokes (I learned to type on manual boards, a long, long time ago, and I’m still a bit heavy—at the paper I used to work for, close to deadline, the workbenches would regularly shake) better than most… But this is the smallest input device I’ve yet found that just doesn’t get incredibly in the way when you’re trying to work with it. Those little Blackberry keyboards don’t come close, and touchscreens, same deal, so far. The hunt and peck, three or more letters to a key systems (press it three times for ‘c’… wait or add something from another key and then delete it if you happen to need another letter on the same key next) on a lot of portable devices are maddeningly slow, as well. I’d love to come up with something portable that can allow the same kind of flow I get sitting at a full-sized board, but it’s yet to happen. In a certain novel I ground out a while ago, I concocted these tiny handhelds you could whisper and murmur to, a bit below what most around you would hear, and the little gizmo would understand it, turn it into text or instructions or so on, and this was a bit of wistful, wishful thinking, I’m afraid… tho’ I’m not even sure how happy that would make me. I suspect if I had to narrate everything I wrote, too, even at low volumes, my voice might get a bit tired. And I did, actually, experiment some with gizmos of this nature (tho’ much bigger ones: desktop machines running voice-recognition) a decade or so out of necessity (carpal tunnel damage—go fig), and found them (a) really very annoying but just useable for some prose, and (b) incredibly unfriendly for doing code, despite some effort to teach ‘em the shape of C++ and C. So fingers might still have their advantages even over that, if you can just come up with a machine they can talk to fast enough… This is something of a grail, for me: being able to write at the speed I do on a full-sized board, but on something I could pull out of my pocket, if need be…

My latest experiment at addressing this frustration in the portable space was to concoct a chordal entry scheme for the PSP. Chordal keyboards are nothing new—I know they’ve been used in courtroom transcription, might still be, don’t know—the basic notion is combinations of keys set up a chord, and then you strike another set of keys to do the entry*—trained operators can keep up with natural human speech, apparently, tho’ there’s quite the learning curve… (Note: apparently, this ain’t quite right; correction below at *).

At first glance, the PSP isn’t the most promising instrument for this experiment. It’s got a total of ten buttons and an analogue stick, and that doesn’t seem like much for text entry. But then again, as it’s basically a game controller with a screen, it’s also designed so you can get to them all (or, at least, all the buttons—the analogue stick competes with one of the four-button pads) at once with extremely minimal hand movements. So chordal approaches are definitely recommended, here. And if you just do that math, 10 keys is certainly more than enough for the characters you’ll need.

So I wrote up a program to do this: used five keys for chording, four for strike, the last as essentially a shift key (which also makes it chordal too, really, if you’re keeping up), and working within the ergonomic limits of the device’s arrangement, came up with 18 chordal configurations (36 with that shift—this adds up to less than 26 because certain combinations are completely impractical on the device, or, at the very least, would severely impair speed) by four strike keys for 144 entry possibilities without any mode-switching nonsense. So you can put the whole 26-letter roman alphabet in there, with capitals, and all the symbols and numbers on a standard board plus function keys and sundry things and still have room to spare, tho’, of course, some of the modal/chordal keys from the standard board most of you use (like Ctrl and Alt and/or the Apple cloverleaf symbol, if you’re of that persuasion) would have to be used in a mode-switching approach, if at all. Anyway, the upshot is: by setting the chord with your left hand and setting shift and striking with your right, you can write prose on the thing, or code, or whatever… I used Dvorak’s stuff on mapping higher frequency stuff to easier positions (in my case, easier chords, mostly, though some of the strike keys are also naturally a little easier, too), then added some WPM-calculation stuff, a simple text editor thingy just for testing purposes, and tried to see if I could teach my fingers this new trick.

So far, I’m not sure it’s a success. But it’s as close as I’ve seen on a pocket device in a while. It looks like the rate of entry on the thing is going to be at least somewhere around 25 wpm for me—after about a day of fiddling with it, that’s what I get on short snippets of text my fingers can memorize, even including rare/harder-to-chord characters (40 is doable on certain phrases, but is probably no good indicator for general writing)—I get more like 12-20 if I’m composing, still having to remember where stuff is without looking (this is why the variability—sometimes, you just get frozen and thinking ‘Where the hell is ‘n’ again,’ for some seconds, and this makes it lower). It might get higher—not sure. There might be a lower threshold after all, despite the known advantages of chordal in better-engineered boards, due to the need to set up the chord adding time to each strike, time that more than negates the small cost of moving fingers on a standard board.

Guess we’ll see. Damn, tho’, it’s nice to get a little closer. I mean, what kind of world is this if we can’t write books while standing in line at the airport?

It’s an idea whose time has come, I tells ya…

*Correction: apparently, court stenotypes don’t even divide between chordal and strike keys: all the keys are struck (by both hands) at about the same time, and the system is generally syllabic (as in: one strike one syllable, with one hand doing the start and vowel, second doing the terminal consonant), with associated use-specific macros added in for certain words and phrases to save strokes… Mea culpe. And interesting. I probably don’t have enough keys here to make that work for syllables, but I can actually get more combinations with those ten if I treat it that way… Hmmm… Must mull…
So there was a report out earlier this week about a rather cool proof of concept attack on the SSL PKI stuff setting up the chain of trust the browser you’re probably using to read this uses…

Cool/scary things about the attack: i) it used that MD5 collision stuff that turned up a few years ago (more on this in a bit), ii) they used a PS3 cluster (200 machines or so) to find useful collisions (PS3s are easily the cheapest and easiest way to get your hands on a Cell processor, which is apparently pretty good at doing this kind of thing), iii) it was pretty cheap: apart from the computing costs (probably in one to a very few thousands of bucks to do on commercially available cluster services like Google uses), the proof of concept cost the team just some $657 in certificate requests from the root CA they wanted to impersonate, and, umm… iv) yeah, and this is the real trouble, here: they were able to use the collision to generate an apparently valid cert from the root CA which allowed them to set up their own ‘rogue’ CA as an intermediate CA…

v) which, in English and in terms of potential ramfications, means, yes, this matters to you, whether you’re running an ecommerce site or using them. Because anyone else could now, quite practically, do just the same, set up an apparently valid intermediate CA, and sign certs for phishing and scamming sites to their heart’s content. And users suckered onto those would have no practical way of telling them from the real thing: the cert would look good, browser wouldn’t bitch, it’d all look legit and secure.

The full circle part: the MD5 collision and what it would eventually mean was one of the very first posts I ever wrote, way back in 2004, when I first took it into my head to start blogging…

Guess eventually is now.

Anyway speaking of now, they’re fixing it now (this is the good news part), and they pretty much have to: the few CAs left using MD5 for their hashes are moving quick to SHA-1. And this does effectively close the window of opportunity for the black hats: the technique demonstrated needs the root CA up and running and signing certs using MD5 for the fingerprint to work; as long as the root CAs stop doing that pronto, the attack stays theoretical…

Wait a few days, and maybe not. That PS3 cluster cranked through the work quick enough that the team got their collision in about four weekends of work (they used weekends because the root CAs are usually less busy then—makes it easier).

In related news, I now find myself looking upon my PS3 with a little more respect, still. Sure, there’s only so many games on the thing I’m ever going to want to play. But hey, it’s still a good, cheap, Blu-Ray player…

And if I ever need a supercomputing cluster, apparently I’m already 1/200th of the way there.

03/01/2009 : Emergent after all

So there’s this retread of a story getting some play again: this notion that it’s actually a fairly small group of rather obsessed people who do most of the writing/editing of Wikipedia… the capsule view you may get is that really, Wikipedia isn’t so much an emergent hive mind phenomenon so much as a pretty standard volunteer project, staffed, as usual, by a cadre of diehards who do most of the work.

Except that, really, that capsule view misses an important detail: yes, it’s a relatively small group of people who do most of the edits on the site, but most of those edits are about formatting and classification—the library science stuff. (The source covering this is here.)

Now, don’t get me wrong, that library science stuff does matter. Good classification and consistent formatting are valuable, no question, and without ‘em, any such source would get a lot more annoying to use. But the interesting thing here is: yes, in terms of the information actually present and contributed, the site is very much as previously advertised: 21st century hivemind weirdness. The content mostly comes from a vastly larger group of ‘outsiders’ who don’t seem so much to be regulars on the site.

So we need a slight update to the 80/20 rule, I guess. Twenty percent of the world does eighty percent of the copy editing…

(But can one of the regulars make that edit for me? I’m more a content person, myself.)

02/01/2009 : On message

So User Friendly’s been doing this sequence on those @##$ ‘mandatory’ copyright notices at the beginning of certain disk-based media

It amused me.

Yeah, yeah, I know. World’s a mess. Industrial economies from the dateline counter-clockwise all ‘round the world back to that same dateline going belly-up like so many guppies in an overheated fishtank, wars and climate chaos, folk getting free passes to Syria for knowing slightly too many people named Ahab, and still, I’m gonna take a moment and bitch about watching a copyright notice I could, I suppose, theoretically, ignore while I went to the bathroom or somethin’.

(Or, I guess, alternative to the bathroom break, I could just take a valium. Those come in handy when economies are tanking, after all. But I digress…)

But, of course, I’ve bitched about this before. Best moment was plunking down all that green for HD gear only to discover it’s infested with that BS, too… Great… Here’s a few grand… On which you will insist I first watch copyright messages…

And it did also briefly strike me there is some grist for thought, here. So here’s Sid, the guy who actually pays for his DVDs (power, brother—I still do that, too—and yes, I know, this probably makes me weird) getting hassled, and I got to thinking: that’s just the way, isn’t it? It’s those of us with vestiges of a conscience left who always get it first. And all those ugly little laws trying to make piling up slightly too many prerecorded programs on your PVR illegal, duping a DVD or CD that got scratched indictable, sticking the DVD on your iPod or your PSP without the appropriate corporate-approved software handling it a good enough reason to seize your hard drive and waterboard it—all that shit is just a matter of certain money grubbers in an industry in a tight spot reaching for the low-hanging fruit. An organized syndicate doing mass dupes and sellin’ ‘em, those guys are smart, know how and where to operate—which makes tracking ‘em down and making ‘em pay for their ill-gotten gains inconvenient. Dicking around with enforcement and rules and making more difficult the lives of ordinary and mostly honest folks who’d just like to watch their damned perfectly validly paid-for disk when and where they want, on the other hand, that’s so much easier…

But they’d better watch ‘emselves tho’, I say. I mean, I’m getting it. They’re on message, all right. Let’s mess with the guys with a conscience, huh?

Hey, listen, MPAA, you’re the guys who make all those movies with the standard ‘nice guy pushed too far’ cliche in full bloom. So you should know how this works:

So let’s be clear, here: as per yer cliche, I think the understanding here is my conscience might just be somewhat detachable, given appropriate extremes of annoyance…

And I know how to run BitTorrent, more than well enough, dearies. Know how DRM works pretty well, too, now that you mention it. Even know some of the really, really stupid implementation tricks you wankers have written into far, far too many of your schemes… So I could very, very easily go all piratey on yer asses if you get me pissed off enough…

You don’t want that, trust me. Think of it as Michael Douglas in that POed white male movie of his (or is that all his movies… my memory fails… they do sorta blur, after a while… jes’ sayin’)…

Or nice girl Willow goin’ all veiny and homicidal after that hot blonde goddess fried her lover—whichever…

‘Cept with a DVD burner, instead of guns and bloodlust.

Anyway. My point is: don’t mess with the nice guys. There’s gotta be some nice, real criminals actually offending against existing, sensible laws you can mess with, somewhere, fer cryin’ out loud. Leave Sid alone, if you know what’s good for you.